Cathedral News

 Annual Filipino Festival Next Sunday, September 24

Our local Filipino Community is hosting an evening rich in culture—faith, food, and more.  Funds raised  at this event go directly toward the Cathedral Scholarship Fund, which helps students, whose parents have limited income, attend a Catholic school. The recommended donation is $10/$10/person over the age of 10.  No reservations are required. 

In 1989, just two years after St. Lorenzo de Ruiz, the first martyr of the Philippines, was canonized by Pope John Paul II, the local Filipino Community and the Cathedral of the Assumption started the tradition of a Filipino Festival.  At the 5:30 pm Mass, a statue and banner commemorating St. Lorenzo are carried in procession.  The buffet of home-cooked Filipino dishes follows immediately in the Undercroft.  Please plan to come. 

pet

If you own a pet, or a pet owns you, plan to attend the Blessing of the Animals to be held on the front steps of the Cathedral on Sunday, October 1, at 2 pm.  This brief service gives us the opportunity to mark the Feast of Saint Francis of Assisi and to give thanks for our pets. All are welcome!

 Hurricane Irma has caused massive destruction in Florida and the Caribbean.  We can support our brothers and sisters in these areas through monetary donations that will be used to specifically support the Diocese of Saint Thomas in the Virgin Island, recovery efforts of Catholic Charities, and efforts to provide pastoral and rebuilding support to the impacted dioceses through the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.  Checks should include the notation: 2017 Hurricane Irma Collection and can be turned into the parish or mailed directly to: Archdiocese of Louisville, ATTN: Finance Office, P.O. Box 32533, Louisville, KY 40232-2533.

Thinking of Becoming Catholic?  If you have thought of becoming Catholic, or if you have questions about the Catholic Church, the Cathedral offers RCIA (Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults) classes. Classes meet on Sunday mornings after 9:30 Mass.   For information please contact George Kaissieh, 657-5217 or gkaissieh@cathedraloftheassumption.org. 

Check out The Record article featuring parishioner Linda Squire and Opioid Epidemic. 

Want to check out some 360 degree photos of the Cathedral?  Kelsey Hillary of sanctum360.org took photos today.  Click here to see them.

Cathedral featured in music video of "Say a Prayer."  Click here to view.   

Cathedral's Daily Lunch Program to be honored.  Click here to read Sheldon Shafer's article that appeared in the Courier Journal on May 10.

Vatican Observatory highlights Msgr. Bouchet's telescope housed in the Archdiocese of Louisville History Center. Click here to check it out!!!!

Tek4Kids, Inc. (Gary and Cathy Boice’s nonprofit) uses education and technology to break the poverty cycle in Haiti.  They provide existing schools in Haiti with clean water, electricity, computers and teachers.  Children share clean water with their families, reducing instances of cholera and waterborne illnesses. Students that receive computer skills from the Tek4Kids program will be able to find much more advanced jobs despite the high unemployment rate in the area. To learn more about Tek4Kids, visit www.tek4kids.org


  Become a friend of the Cathedral on Facebook.

    Follow us on twitter  @cathedral1852

 

Click the Feedback on the top blue bar to comment on our web site.

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday - Sept 26
We are safe at home now.  I'll comment later about Day 15 and travel.
But first I wanted to tie a few loose ends together.   I mentioned last Monday about the open house and Max daughter.  Tonisha is 7 and a very confident little lady, dressed to the nines.  When you see her and most of the kids going to the various schools dressed in clean uniforms every day, you tend to lose sight of the actual living conditions most of them deal with at home.  Tonisha was not at all uncomfortable milling around the crowd.  Here's a picture of her with Cathy.

Travel to and from Jeremie is an intricate mesh of things that only Gary can manage.  It's one thing to call a travel agent to book flights from Louisville to Port au Prince and back.  Simple, easy, no big deal.  From there it takes multiple people to be in the right place at the right time.  So here's a typical return agenda.  Gary calls Roger the charter pilot the day before to make sure things are still on track for him and weather report is good, then he calls Fr Ernest, the principal of College St Louis the night before to bargain for a ride from the house to the Jeremie International landing strip, followed by a call to Lazar to make sure he can meet us in Port au Prince.


So Gary, Cathy, Bob and I are ready to be picked up by Fr Ernest at 8:30 AM.  Eric and Rose look happy to see us leave here, but there has to be some trepidation on their part as they begin fending for themselves for the next few months.



So the ride to the landing strip is about 10 miles... 8 1/2 of which are basically on a hard dirt road which has suffered from erosion and lack of grading on a periodic basis.  So a 20-30 minute ride is bone jarring.
We got to the strip shortly before 9.  Roger didn't land till about 9:15 because of a head wind.  Then we loaded our bags and selves for the 1 hour or so flight to Port au Prince.  Gary asked Roger to swing in toward town a bit to see if we could get a picture of the College du Sacre Coeur site where the technical school is located.  Roger initially swung in so we were over the site, so he circled around for a better view.  And here it is.

After the photo session, we rose to cruising altitude and picked up the tail wind that Roger had dealt with as a head wind. 

We landed in Port au Prince about 10:30.  Bags out of plane, lug bags with Lazar to his SUV, then make the ride to the other end of airport where commercial jets come in ... Traffic not too bad, two weeks ago, going the other way it was really chaotic.  Bags out of Lazar's car, then thru immigration where you must have the green card that you ended up with upon arrival in Haiti.  Don't know what happens if that card is lost ... don't want to find out!  Next we check in and get baggage checked.  Always a certain amount of chaos with the crowd.  Finally got our 4 bags checked ... each bag had one of our personal smaller bags inside, along with several laptops we are bringing back to the states for repair, and most importantly, my yellow tool bag. 

My tool bag has something of a reputation of its own.  I usually do the network cable work (among many other things) and need several tools and test equipment.  Gary swears he has all that I need, but we can never find everything or if we do the batteries in a tester have been known to be dead.  So I insist on bringing my own.  Also have a measuring tape inside ... never enough tapes around, 2 good screw drivers, wire cutters, a couple of rolls of black electrical tape, tags for marking wires.  Guys know I've got things, so many times I'm the supplier of something they can't find.  Earlier on Yemi borrowed my best screwdriver ... threatened to follow him to the ends of the earth if he didn't get it back into my hands.  He laughed thinking I was kidding, but he did very ceremoniously return it when he was done!
 
Now, on to airport security, kick off shoes, go through X-ray.  Gary's back pack set off something, so his backpack got searched ... a finger nail clipper was dug out.  Security agent looks at it, swivels out the file, breaks the file off and tosses it in a trash barrel.  Gary swears the clippers have been in his back pack going through security for years!  On to American Airlines section, go through their security.  And finally up to a waiting lounge ... well that's a bit of a stretch, but some tables, chairs and some places where you can get a bite to eat and wait.  About 1:30 the surge begins for boarding .. no one seems to understand lines, but eventually we're on board.

 
Take off and landing in Miami smooth ... about 4:30.  Then it's the US Immigration process with automated kiosks where you put your passport into a slot and look into a camera for a picture.  Receipt prints out ... OMG, is that really me?  Hike to next phase of Immigration, tell agent you are happy to return and answer a few more questions.  Next it's to the baggage carousel, get checked bags, hike to next phase of Customs Control, answer more questions, take bags to handlers where bags magically get to your flight (you hope), then US TSA security check ... kick off shoes, etc, go thru X-ray.  Finally into main terminal.  Feels good to be in air conditioning and walk by all the overpriced shops that cater to those who really need a suit, shoes, pedicure, jewelry for someone, books or most anything else.  Must be 5:30 or so ... not too bad this time.  Now we can find a restaurant for some real eats and a beer other than Prestige!


About 7:45 PM our flight to Louisville begins boarding.  I lost the lottery and had to sit next to Gary.  Cathy a few rows in front, Bob a few rows behind.  I holler to Bob asking if he wants to swap seats ... no deal ... I'm always giving Gary grief about something, but we do enjoy each other.  Talked quite a bit, dozed some.

Landed on good old Louisville about 10:30, a few minutes early, kiss the carpet in  Standiford Field (aka Louisville International Airport).  Bags show up at carousel and loved ones meet us at curb.  Nothing like getting back to the Watterson Expressway and on to home.  Great to see Mary Ann at the door along with our dogs to greet me.  This morning I emptied my bag and tossed all the clothes I had into the washing machine ... I'm sure the salt content from all my seating did something to the drain.
As I write this, I'm decompressing, adrenalin is easing back, I've dozed a few times and life is moving back toward some decree of normality.  Got a call from Paul Olliges.  He was going to return my recorders that he used in my absence to record homilies for web site.  His car had died at PNC a block from our house, so I walked up to meet him while he was waiting for AAA to arrive.  Just got note saying his battery was dead and needed a new one.


All in all, the trip was a very good one.  We got a lot done, the Technical School opened as planned, no one got sick or hurt.  An interesting side note, Gary and Cathy visited several of the elementary schools on Thursday.  At one of the newer ones, the principal told them that parents were asking about the water their kids were getting.  When they were assured it was safe water, one of the parents asked "is it Tek4Kids water?"  Word is out!  The people of Jeremie know we are there on a regular basis.  Their kids get pure water and in the schools where we have teachers enhancing the rote Haitian teaching with things like typing instruction, use of word processing, spreadsheet manipulation.  Feedback we get is positive, just need more.  If you are so inclined, visit www.Tek4Kids.org to learn more.  We can use donations any time.  If you are interested in helping in other ways, there is information.


So I'll close this little journey of tidbits about our activities with a blessing ...

Rejoice in the unconditional love and mercy that God has offered us.  Amen!